In his newsletter on technology and society, The Convivial Society, Vol 2: No 11, L.M. Sacasas posted forty-one questions in "The questions concerning technology" that can help us think about the ethical implications of our tools. It is easy to act as if our tools are completely amoral, but Sacasas' questions quickly dispel that fallacy. His questions are important for both the creators and consumers of technology. He starts with

  1. What sort of person will the use of this technology make of me?
  2. What habits will the use of this technology instill?
  3. How will the use of this technology affect my experience of time?
  4. How will the use of this technology affect my experience of place?
  5. How will the use of this technology affect how I relate to other people?

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Tech 2Amy Crouch in Comment, June 10, 2021, from Cardus, asks some important questions about technology's promises and suggests a new framework "centred not on ease or distraction, but flourishing. Perhaps we don’t need greater convenience in our communities and callings. Perhaps instead we need help to venture further on the straight-and-narrow path of righteousness."

Our tech devices are designed to make life easier, but maybe ease isn’t what we need. They’re designed to captivate us, but maybe we need time to look up and around.

Silicon Valley’s technologies promised a revolution in speed and convenience, and they certainly delivered. Yet it’s starting to look like those were the wrong promises. 24/7 communication and distraction haven’t relieved us from stress, boredom, or loneliness.

As our lives become increasingly mediated by algorithms and machines, tech designers need to rethink those promises.

If tech companies aren't willing to transform their priorities, all of us as users still have the responsibility to consider our personal use of the tech "gifts" that we're offered continually. That kind of personal transformation may be revolutionary, but it isn't impossible by the power of the indwelling Spirit of God.

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Blackboard and Books

Education is an essential sphere of human life. Through it, we prepare for the marketplace, become better citizens, develop skills and competences, and form our character. Although education may not always fulfill these goals efficiently or coherently, it is nonetheless vital to the Christian faith. But in what sense can education be “Christian”?

By Harold Klassen

Sometimes a bit of uncertainty can be a marvelous thing.

An article on the uncertainty of statistics is a thing of beauty to read especially when people seem so focused on finding numbers that will support their personal perspective on any subject. Susan Hamersma wrote "Uncertainty: the beauty and bedrock of statistics" for Cardus in Comment magazine, October 22, 2020. Her economic knowledge and experience of how economics shapes public policy give her the authority to speak about the limitations of mathematics and statistics in particular.

If I have been asked this question once, I have been asked it hundreds of times. It is asked most often after I have presented information about how dangerous secular education is to our children’s and grandchildren’s future.

Why are Christian parents, pastors and church leaders unwilling to address the issue of education biblically?

Having been asked this so many times and trying to prayerfully answer it, I have come to the conclusion that the main reason this isn’t happening is DUALISM! This is a term that I first read about in the late Dr. Albert Greene’s book, Recapturing the Future of Christian Education.

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"I love to think of nature as an unlimited broadcasting station, through which God speaks to us every hour, if we will only tune in."

George Washington Carver