Martin Luther invented universal education—for boys and girls of all social classes—and he started institutions to provide it. Ever since, Protestantism has promoted education–among the urban poor of the 19th century, on the mission fields, and in Christian schools today. Now a British researcher has found that this Protestant emphasis on education is a cultural influence that persists to this day, even in seemingly secularized societies. He found that countries with a Protestant background continue to have higher education rates than Catholic countries or those of other religions.

Exploring or learning about anything in God’s world without considering God’s revelation of His plans and purposes for His creation is foolishness. But of course, you know that the Bible, God’s word, is important. Obviously, anything that claims to be Christ-centered must be Bible-based or it is merely the figment of our imagination. But what exactly is the role of the Bible in education? Why do many students struggle to see the relevance of the Bible? Why do many teachers find transformational interactions with their students so much easier outside the classroom, rather than in the midst of studying the details of what God has made, where Romans 1:19-20 says His power and nature are clearly seen?

If the Bible is irrelevant to the most important things taught in school, then it will certainly be irrelevant to the most important things outside of school, too. This is the devilish outcome of dualism. In the end, we all lose.

Is it any wonder the biblical foundations for law, civil government, economics and family that once provided accepted harbor lights for our society have been replaced? The incessant move toward the secularization of education and the privatization of Christianity has been enormously successful, being expedited greatly through elementary and secondary schools.

Is it any wonder our youth are disinterested in church today, since Christianity is deemed irrelevant to the majority of their waking hours?

VV200A simple, memorable diagram like the Visual Valet - Personal assistant for Christian thinkers and teachers, may be worth more than thousands of words about Biblical integration and Christian philosophy of education. A single page summary of three major ways this visual organizer can be used, is available in multiple languages.

Swiss army knifeChristian thinking involves everything in creation as well as the infinite Creator. Busy teachers and maturing students need something to help them. The Visual Valet is just such a personal assistant. Though it may not be sophisticated enough for philosophers and educational theoreticians, it can assist you in becoming a distinctively Christian thinker and teacher. Like a Swiss army knife, it may be incomplete and unsuitable for large projects, but extremely valuable for many daily tasks.

A leader’s worldview affects all that they say, do, and think. When it comes to the development of the school’s curriculum, there is no way to approach the task without it being impacted by one’s worldview. Therefore, it is essential that leaders first recognize their bias and address the influence of their individual perspectives.

Every teacher teaches from a point of view, a point of view determined by his fundamental convictions, philosophical, theological, psychological, scientific, and so on. Those convictions are not something separate from his education, but are shaped by it as it is shaped by them. An atheist sees history, and everything else, differently than a theist; and his atheism may be the result of his education or may simply confirm what his education has taught him.[1]

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"Any system of education…which limits instruction to the arts and sciences, and rejects the aids of religion in forming the character of citizens, is essentially defective."

Noah Webster