To grow an apple tree, we plant a seed, not a cup of applesauce. The seed has within it a new tree; applesauce is the derivative product from the fruit of the mature tree.

To grow a worldview, we plant the correct biblical principles: the seed of the idea, not the product of the mature idea.

We err in our ‘orchards’ when we believe that teaching our children what they should think permanently impacts their worldview. We must train them how to think by equipping them with the tools with which to reason for themselves—the seed thoughts of all thoughts—the principles.

The sad fact is, the secular culture around us displaces our heritage of Christian principles with secular principles. It's time to re-sow the eternal, absolute, unchanging biblical principles of natural and moral law in the education of our children, every day, in every subject, in every way.

David Smith mug

By David I. Smith, first published in Faith & Leadership, March 5, 2019,

Today, teaching is basically viewed as a matter of technique, says David I. Smith.

“It’s like getting your car fixed at the garage,” he said. “You don’t care if your mechanic is a Buddhist as long as it runs again afterward.”

That view of teaching, however, is fundamentally mistaken, said Smith, a scholar who works at the intersection of faith and learning.

“Always, whatever you’re teaching includes some kind of formation,” he said.

Teacher with studentsThere is power in the naming of things. I imagine that when God gave Adam the task of naming the animals, Adam didn’t just think up sounds for what to call them. He connected with the genius of what God made each creature to be, and out of Adam’s discernment of “Christ in all things,” each name came forth from his lips. A true name reveals the essence of a thing. It’s a truth more than a label, claiming its perfect place in the Logos.

I love it when authors name things for me, things that I have known deep in my bones…but not in my mind. Like a blind man, I’ve felt its contours, its texture, it’s temperature, but never quite brought it into full light. The author names a feeling, a connection, an insight, a revelation, and that’s it! A blinding flash of the obvious!

As believers we seek to live a fully integrated life, weaving our understanding of the scriptures and the doctrines of the faith into every nook and cranny of our existence. This is a pretty lofty and abstract goal, and it can be difficult to figure out what it means in practical terms. What, for instance, does the doctrine of the incarnation have to say about the way you engage students in the classroom?

Exploring or learning about anything in God’s world without considering God’s revelation of His plans and purposes for His creation is foolishness. But of course, you know that the Bible, God’s word, is important. Obviously, anything that claims to be Christ-centered must be Bible-based or it is merely the figment of our imagination. But what exactly is the role of the Bible in education? Why do many students struggle to see the relevance of the Bible? Why do many teachers find transformational interactions with their students so much easier outside the classroom, rather than in the midst of studying the details of what God has made, where Romans 1:19-20 says His power and nature are clearly seen?

"Information will never satisfy us because we were made for more and his name is God and he is wisdom."

Kathy Koch