Philosophy of education

Forming the framework of what education should be.

It is that exciting time of year again when high school seniors across the country do their best to fend off “senior-itis” and persevere to wrap up their studies as graduation day approaches.

It is also that time of year when students make decisions about what’s next — work, college or military service; and in some cases, all of the above.

Working in leadership at a university affords me the opportunity to greet dozens of prospective college students and their parents who are wrestling with choosing the right college.

A number of important questions bear on that decision. I try to help by asking them to consider potentially the most important question: “Have you thought about a college education as spiritual formation?”

A leader’s worldview affects all that they say, do, and think. When it comes to the development of the school’s curriculum, there is no way to approach the task without it being impacted by one’s worldview. Therefore, it is essential that leaders first recognize their bias and address the influence of their individual perspectives.

Every teacher teaches from a point of view, a point of view determined by his fundamental convictions, philosophical, theological, psychological, scientific, and so on. Those convictions are not something separate from his education, but are shaped by it as it is shaped by them. An atheist sees history, and everything else, differently than a theist; and his atheism may be the result of his education or may simply confirm what his education has taught him.[1]

Hands boundBy Glen Schultz on March 16, 2015 in the Kingdom Education Ministries blog, reprinted in Renewanation, 2016-08-30

I have referred to Colossians 2:8 in several posts in recent weeks. It is Paul’s warning to Christians about the danger of being taken captive by false philosophies or ideas. There is one person who made a statement over 100 years ago that has ended up taking millions of children captive to a dangerous false idea over the years. I remember well studying about this man when I was in elementary school. He was held in high esteem in both the textbooks I read and the teachers I had. His name was Horace Mann.

There are vast differences in people’s understanding of each term in the title so it is appropriate to briefly describe the perspective of this paper to eliminate uncertainty or confusion. The definition of education will be directly related to Jesus Christ so it is authentically Christian. The philosophic presupposition is that ultimate reality is intimately related to the triune God who has revealed Himself[1] through His created world—the spiritual and physical universe, His written word—the Bible, and the living Word—Jesus Christ. Because the scope of this paper is limited, the implications of this perspective will be considered instead of arguments for this presupposition. The unity and consistency of a perfect God’s self-revelation requires that the Bible be accepted as the infallible measure of the accuracy of the perception we have of God from our environment or from our personal relationship to Him. Thus the strengths of mysticism and pragmatism are preserved while their limitations are avoided by depending on the Bible as the final authority in all matters which it addresses. This paper, therefore, quotes the Scriptures as justification for the concepts that are presented.

A most important decision

Deciding which school you will choose for your child is one of the most important decisions you will make. It is a decision that will not only affect your child’s emotional and mental development and his or her future career prospects it will also affect his or her eternal destiny. Jesus said, “What good will it be for a man if he gains the whole world, yet forfeits his soul? Or what can a man give in exchange for his soul?” (Matthew 16:26 NIV)

All education teaches children values. You have the choice whether your child grows up with Christian values or secular values. This&hellip...is written to assist you in making that choice.