Transforming Teachers - Reading

  • How are we reading?

    John Stonestreet from Summit got my attention in an article he wrote March 12, 2009.

    “Personally, I am much more concerned about how we are reading than what we reading. Most of the students I work with, in high school and college, show just an utter lack of discernment in both their reading choices and their reading practice. Not that we should just read anything—that is actually my point. When the average Christian cannot tell the difference between good books and bad ones, the bigger problem is with the Christian who is reading and not the book being read.

    I offer you two great quotes, and one great book, on this way of thinking:

    1. “For every new book, read three old ones.” (C.S. Lewis)
    2. “If you still buy the books at the front of the Christian bookstore, stop it.” (Kevin Bywater)
    3. Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business (1985)."
  • Surviving information overload

    We are bombarded by more and more information every day. One study noted that until 1900 human knowledge doubled approximately every century. By 2013 knowledge was doubling every 13 months. One can only imagine how fast knowledge is doubling today.

    What is even more mind boggling is how much data is being produced on the internet. It is now predicted that there will be 40 zettabytes of data available by the end of 2020. This is a whopping 40 trillion gigabytes! It would take a person 180 million years to download all the data that is currently on the internet.

    It is hard to comprehend what is important from all the headlines that flood our minds every second. These so-called vital facts are on topics ranging from global warming to Harry and Meghan’s exit from the Royal Family. Let me ask you a question as an example of how difficult it is to discern fact from fiction these days. What is the coronavirus and what is the real danger we are facing concerning it?

    There is one thing for certain related to information overload – we have lost our ability to discern truth! This is a big problem and it has significant impact on how we educate future generations.