Transforming Teachers - Philosophy

  • Biblical knowing and teaching

    This monography addresses professional educators who wish consciously to relate educational decisions to a biblical world view....It will focus mainly on two matters: a theory of knowing and a classroom methodology which is compatible with it.

  • Book summary: A Christian philosophy of education

    A summary of Gordon Clark's book, A Christian Philosophy of Educationby Dr. C. Matthew McMahon on A Puritan's Mind

    Those who can, do; those who cannot, teach; those who cannot teach, teach Education. This kind of statement describes the American educational system in more ways than one. Education is too important to neglect it or hand it over to those who cannot or do not know how to educate children and young adults. Most American colleges have no philosophy of education at all. They may have some vague ideals or aims. But no concrete philosophy that has any value. Though American colleges do not have a philosophy of education that can be called unified, or have an elaborate world-view set for their students, instead, they cater to having a unity in opposition to Christianity.

  • Cates: A Christian philosophy of education

    “From a Christian philosophy of education, thoughts and actions can be derived, implemented, and defended. The elements to be considered in developing a Christian philosophy of education range from theological and doctrinal to social and educational. The first step is the development of a Biblical base. The Bible becomes the skeleton on which the practical application of our philosophy can be arranged.”

  • Clark: A Christian philosophy of education

    For long periods of time human history moves placidly along, troubled only by minor disturbances. Then in a short span of years, everything seems to happen at once. A storm overtakes the race, breaking up all the fountains of the great deep; and when the waters subside, the course of history has been set for the next epoch.…

    While the political situation that makes newspaper headlines occupies popular attention, the use which dictators have made of education shows clearly that the role of schools and universities is of more profound significance. Educational policy in the new society, whether for good or evil, will be a basic factor.

  • Consider college education as spiritual formation

    It is that exciting time of year again when high school seniors across the country do their best to fend off “senior-itis” and persevere to wrap up their studies as graduation day approaches.

    It is also that time of year when students make decisions about what’s next — work, college or military service; and in some cases, all of the above.

    Working in leadership at a university affords me the opportunity to greet dozens of prospective college students and their parents who are wrestling with choosing the right college.

    A number of important questions bear on that decision. I try to help by asking them to consider potentially the most important question: “Have you thought about a college education as spiritual formation?”

  • Philosophy of Christian education

    There are vast differences in people’s understanding of each term in the title so it is appropriate to briefly describe the perspective of this paper to eliminate uncertainty or confusion. The definition of education will be directly related to Jesus Christ so it is authentically Christian. The philosophic presupposition is that ultimate reality is intimately related to the triune God who has revealed Himself[1] through His created world—the spiritual and physical universe, His written word—the Bible, and the living Word—Jesus Christ. Because the scope of this paper is limited, the implications of this perspective will be considered instead of arguments for this presupposition. The unity and consistency of a perfect God’s self-revelation requires that the Bible be accepted as the infallible measure of the accuracy of the perception we have of God from our environment or from our personal relationship to Him. Thus the strengths of mysticism and pragmatism are preserved while their limitations are avoided by depending on the Bible as the final authority in all matters which it addresses. This paper, therefore, quotes the Scriptures as justification for the concepts that are presented.

  • Ratio Christi

    “…a global movement that equips university students and faculty to give historical, philosophical, and scientific reasons for following Jesus Christ”



  • Reclaiming the Christian intellectual tradition

    Joe Neff, editor of The Principal Connection introduced me to this series recently. It "is particularly designed for Christian students and others associated with college and university campuses.... The contributors...explore how the Bible has been interpreted in the history of the church, as well as how theology has been formulated. They will ask: How does the Christian faith influence our understanding of culture, literature, philosophy, government, beauty, art, or work? How does the Christian intellectual tradition help us understand truth? How does the Christian intellectual tradition shape our approach to education?"

    If you're looking for something to stimulate your thinking about a particular area, these books would be a great place to start. There are Kindle, paperback and print-to-order paperback versions to fit various price ranges.

        Ethics and Moral Reasoning: A Student's Guide

        Philosophy: A Student's Guide

        Political Thought: A Student's Guide

        Art and Music: A Student's Guide

        History: A Student's Guide

        The Natural Sciences: A Student's Guide

        Psychology: A Student's Guide

        Literature: A Student's Guide

        The Liberal Arts: A Student's Guide

        Christian Worldview: A Student's Guide

        The Great Tradition of Christian Thinking: A Student's Guide

    “It is what you read when you don't have to that determines what you will be when you can't help it.”
    Oscar Wilde

  • Stand to Reason

    "…trains Christians to think more clearly about their faith and to make an even-handed, incisive, yet gracious defense for classical Christianity and classical Christian values in the public square"

  • The lie that has taken millions captive

    Hands boundBy Glen Schultz on March 16, 2015 in the Kingdom Education Ministries blog, reprinted in Renewanation, 2016-08-30

    I have referred to Colossians 2:8 in several posts in recent weeks. It is Paul’s warning to Christians about the danger of being taken captive by false philosophies or ideas. There is one person who made a statement over 100 years ago that has ended up taking millions of children captive to a dangerous false idea over the years. I remember well studying about this man when I was in elementary school. He was held in high esteem in both the textbooks I read and the teachers I had. His name was Horace Mann.

  • The moral enterprise of education

    By Scott Masson with Doug Sikkhema, Cardus Audio, December 17, 2014

    Scott speaks with Cardus's Doug Sikkema about the intersection of classical education with Christian education, why creating elitists might not be a bad thing, and whether equality is all it's cracked up to be.

    "Education is first and foremost a moral enterprise. It's about training in virtue. Even the pagan educators recognized that."

    Listen to 29:15 minute interview

  • Why Christian education

    By Jim Drexler in World, posted 2014-09-13

    “I would advise no one to send his child where the Holy Scriptures are not supreme.” Martin Luther’s bold admonition reflects the teachings of both the Old and the New Testament. Throughout the Bible, God differentiates between light and darkness, wisdom and ignorance, saved and unsaved, and Jesus himself clearly teaches that “he who is not with me is against me, and he who does not gather with me scatters” (Matthew 12:30). Whether you have been committed to Christian education for years or whether you are just now exploring the possibilities, consider the following from this perspective: How can Christian parents best fulfill their obligation to train and nurture their covenant children (Deuteronomy 6:4–8)? Specifically, what type of education effectively prepares children for “works of service” (Ephesians 4:12)?

    Misconceptions about Christian education

    A Christian school is not a place where a few “ornaments” like prayer, chapels, and Bible classes merely complement an otherwise secular education. Genuine Christian education seeks to integrate God’s Word into every facet of the curriculum as well as all co-curricular activities. As the Puritan theologian Charles Bridges wrote in his commentary on Proverbs, “The religious training must not be the border of the garment, which might easily be cut off. It must be the pervading substance throughout.”

    Second, the phrase “Christian education” should encompass more than the study of religion. Unfortunately, many evangelicals have too narrow a definition. Christian education, they think, takes place only in Sunday school, during Bible studies, or at home during family devotions, but this view is too limited. The apostle Paul exhorts us to “take captive every thought to make it obedient to Christ” (2 Corinthians 10:5). Saint Augustine wrote that “every good and true Christian should understand that wherever he may find truth, it is the Lord’s.” Reflecting the same conviction, John Calvin wrote, “We shall neither reject the truth itself, nor despise it whenever it shall appear, unless we wish to dishonor the Spirit of God.” True Christian education relates God’s Word to every aspect of life.

    Third, a Christian school is not a “safe house” from the world. Many well-meaning parents think that the Christian school offers protection from the evils of the world. A Christian school is not a guarantee against sin. The difference, however, is that the Christian school disciplines by teaching students about God’s demands, and His forgiveness, grace and mercy.

    Finally, the Christian school is not a reform school for families who have exhausted other options to solve their problems. The Christian school should be their first choice, the place where Christian families, the church, and the Christian school can prepare students for effective lives of service in God’s kingdom.

    Full article