Biblical worldview

  • Scott Hayden at the International Community School in Thailand has been instrumental in helping the school think about developing discerning thinkers.

    He has very helpful examples of the importance of avoiding assumptive language—a very real problem, especially when assessing students. An important part of the power of education to shape thinking is the assumptive language of the teacher, but it is easy to misuse the power to coerce responses rather than allow individual choice. In all environments, it is easy to misuse the power of teachers to get students to say what the teacher wants them to say. As Christians, we want students to know and love God through Jesus Christ and in the power of the Holy Spirit unselfishly love others. However, producing “marks Christians” doesn’t honor the God who graciously and humbly allows personal choice even though the majority of His creation reject His love.

    Especially in a mixed environment where there is a very wide range of perspectives on Biblical truth, it is important to consider the words that we use. Many teachers find themselves in an environment hostile to the overt presentation of truth, but this video not only points them away from pitfalls, but towards new opportunities for truth to be considered. Christians should be interested in critical and discerning thinking because of our understanding of God’s image in all people. We, of all people, should promote the development of the God-given gifts of logic, understanding and communication. Asking the right kind of questions can open rather than close consideration of controversial ideas.

  • James Nickel writes short essays “with the goal of unveiling the vistas and power of mathematics as seen through Biblical Christian eyes”

  • "…provides educational materials written from a biblical worldview that focus on academic rigor and encourage critical thinking—all supported by appropriate educational technology."

  • Scott Hayden at the International Community School in Thailand lead a year of conversation during the 2012-13 school year about Biblical worldview integration.

    “Teaching a Biblical worldview to students of other faiths can feel like spanning a divide between two continents. Consider worldview building–Bridge Building. You are not preaching the gospel or giving invitations in academic courses but you are making a way for them to visit, understand, and appreciate a significant alternative way to see the world.”

    At the end of the 13:22 presentation, you will be challenged to consider:

    1. What's immediately useable?
    2. What's got potential?
    3. What's debatable?

    Members of this website can post their comments below.

     

  • "…advancing the cause of biblical Christian education in K-12 education, including college students and adults"

  • Resources from a Christian perspective (i.e., a biblical worldview), collected by Katherine Loop

  • "…a Canadian, Christian, mission organization serving children in developing countries with quality education rooted in a Biblical worldview"

  • Everyone seems to believe that education is the way to bring about positive change in the world. Education that makes a difference—transformational education—is a highly desirable commodity. Training, instruction and nurture are 3 dimensions of education, but having all 3 present and in balance is a lot easier said than done. This video explores what is needed for education to fulfill its promise of positive change as it becomes Transform-ED.

    You can watch an Office Mix which considers various similies we use to describe what the Bible is like and their implications for Biblical integration. It is also possible to download a video of the presentation.

    The PowerPoint slides were designed by Sandy Strukoff.

  • An on-line course "for Christian teachers, school principals and others who want to impart a greater sense of meaning and purpose to students of all ages”

  • Teacher with studentsThere is power in the naming of things. I imagine that when God gave Adam the task of naming the animals, Adam didn’t just think up sounds for what to call them. He connected with the genius of what God made each creature to be, and out of Adam’s discernment of “Christ in all things,” each name came forth from his lips. A true name reveals the essence of a thing. It’s a truth more than a label, claiming its perfect place in the Logos.

    I love it when authors name things for me, things that I have known deep in my bones…but not in my mind. Like a blind man, I’ve felt its contours, its texture, it’s temperature, but never quite brought it into full light. The author names a feeling, a connection, an insight, a revelation, and that’s it! A blinding flash of the obvious!

  • “All education is a deeply theological activity. The outcome will depend on which God you believe owns truth and the effectiveness of your methods”

  • theory of evolutionMorality is a very difficult problem for the evolutionary worldview. This is not to say that evolutionists are somehow less moral than biblical creationists—or anyone else. Most evolutionists adhere to a moral code and believe in the concept of right and wrong. But evolutionists have no rational reason for this position. Thus, only creationists have a rational, logical, and consistent reason for morality.

  • "“Having a Christian worldview means being utterly convinced that biblical principles are not only true but also work better in the grit and grime of the real world.”

    Nancy Pearcey

  • “To strengthen America's families and values by helping parents prepare college-worthy, character witnesses of Christ for the next generation.”

  • “…a comprehensive consulting firm dedicated to a biblical worldview that seeks excellence to the glory of God in all areas of leadership and development in education”

  • To grow an apple tree, we plant a seed, not a cup of applesauce. The seed has within it a new tree; applesauce is the derivative product from the fruit of the mature tree.

    To grow a worldview, we plant the correct biblical principles: the seed of the idea, not the product of the mature idea.

    We err in our ‘orchards’ when we believe that teaching our children what they should think permanently impacts their worldview. We must train them how to think by equipping them with the tools with which to reason for themselves—the seed thoughts of all thoughts—the principles.

    The sad fact is, the secular culture around us displaces our heritage of Christian principles with secular principles. It's time to re-sow the eternal, absolute, unchanging biblical principles of natural and moral law in the education of our children, every day, in every subject, in every way.

  • “…seeks to cultivate minds and hearts that love God, their neighbor, and all that is true, good, and beautiful”

  • "Find contentment and confidence in your finances" by going "deeper in your understanding of biblical financial wisdom"

  • “…helps Christian schools make vision a reality and supports those who work with Christian schools”

  • "Uniting home, church, & school in Jesus Christ” by promoting “the education of children toward a Biblical worldview by providing information, training, fellowship and avenues of influence for pastors, educational leaders and God’s people”

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