Transformational education

Our intentional involvement in what God is doing to draw people to Himself and make them like Jesus through education.

By Christian Overman in Worldview Matters, January 2, 2018Larkmead School Abingdon Oxfordshire, Blackcatuk at English Wikipedia [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Millions of children from Christian homes are indoctrinated daily in the tenets of secularism—by means of silence from two sides.

Separating the Word of God from academics in school has spawned a debilitating yet popular mindset known as “SSD,” or the “Sacred-Secular Divide.” This dualism constricts the Light of Scripture to Sunday morning sermons, and does not apply it to business, law, medicine, art, civil governance or anything else outside the four walls of a church.

A secularized math class that never explores how numbers fit into God’s plan for humans to govern over all of creation, is as senseless as a secularized Sunday School. Once education becomes secularized, God’s Word can then be marginalized, privatized, and made solely personal.

When dualism reigns, Christianity is not applicable to the public square, or to the daily workplace. It’s only good for Sunday morning services, and nothing beyond.

By Gene Edward Veith in World, December 22, 2007Salt shaker

After building strong families, the surest tactic for winning the culture war is plain: Give your kids a better education than their secularist peers.

When Christians are better educated than the non-Christians, Christians will become the major culture-shapers.

By John Stonestreet in September 6, 2016, BreakPointJohn Stonestreet

Christian Overman, who directs the Seattle-based Worldview Matters and is a commissioned Colson Fellow, believes—and I largely agree—that we’ve lost the culture because we’ve lost our schools—including, in some cases, important distinctives that make Christian schools, well, Christian. “The shaping of nations begins in the minds of children,” Chris says. “Nation-shaping ideas acquired in elementary and secondary schools are not immediately felt on a national level because it takes time for little acorns to grow into giant oaks. But grow they will.”

In a new, thought-provoking e-book, “The Lost Purpose for Learning,” Chris articulates clearly what has gone awry and offers a systemic, intentional, and repeatable solution for Christian school teachers and headmasters, Sunday school workers, and other church personnel who interact with students between the ages of 4 and 18. Come to BreakPoint.org/free to get a free copy of “The Lost Purpose for Learning” to read and to share. It’s simply “must-reading” for Christians involved in education.

In the appendix to his book, God Our Teacher:Theological Basics in Christian Education, Robert W. Pasmiño discussing some “educational invitations” that are related to the movement into postmodernity. To whet your appetite and stimulate your thinking, I’d like to introduce you to the first of his invitations: return to relational bonds revealed in the Trinity.

“Transformation is central to the journey of faith with our triune God. God is in the business of bringing new life and sustaining life beyond what humans conceive is feasible or desirable.”

Harold Klassen

当我们说道传福音的耶稣,你会想到什么?如果你说想起了耶稣与井边妇人或尼哥底母的谈话,你可能会吃惊。无论是记录了这两个故事的约翰(约翰福音章和<章),还是马可,都没有提及耶稣在传福音。事实上,约翰在他所写的五卷书中,仅两次提及传福音,而在这两次中,是天使在传福音。