At Christian schools, we want our students to develop a Christ-centered worldview, to see all of life through the lens of Scripture, to learn about God and His creation. This is a big challenge!

How can you help your students do this during class?

Have your students connect what they study and Biblical teaching.

What Biblical teaching can you connect to what students are studying?

That depends of what your students are studying:

  • If your science students are studying photons, use Biblical teaching on God’s creative power.
  • If your math students are studying how to pay for a computer, use Biblical teaching on stewardship and debt.
  • If your language arts students are reading Miss Nelson is Missing, use Biblical teaching regarding authority and respect.
  • If your social studies students are studying a war, use Biblical teaching regarding government and war.

How can you determine what Biblical teaching your students should connect with what they study?

Good question. You want relevant Biblical teaching that naturally connects with what your students are studying and helps students answer the question “What’s God’s perspective of what we’re studying?”

Here’s what you can do: Think of what your students are studying. Then identify 1 or more items from the list below that naturally connect to what your students are studying. For example, if my science students are studying photons, that fits with creation.

Here’s the list:

God, people, morality, death, history, creation
Creation, fall, redemption, restoration
Loving God/neighbor, caring for creation, making disciples, being part of the Church
Respect/disrespect of authority, sanctity of life/murder, sexual purity/promiscuity, private property/theft, truth telling/bearing false witness, contentment/covetousness

Got 1 or more items? Good. Now ask yourself, “What does the Bible say about these items that naturally connects to what my students are studying?”

What form should the Biblical teaching take?

Bible verses—your students should definitely connect what they are studying with Bible verses. For example, when your science students are studying photons, they should consider Genesis 1:1. Having your students connect what they are studying with Bible verses reinforces the idea that God’s Word is the foundation of the Christian worldview.

In addition to Bible verses, your students should connect what they are studying with Biblical principles, principles that are supported by 3 or more Bible passages. For example, when your social studies students are studying a war, have them consider the Biblical principles of submitting to governmental authority (Romans 13:1-6, I Peter 2:13-14, Mark 12:17), preserving life (Genesis 9:6, Exodus 20:13, Romans 13:8-10), and using nonviolence (Matthew 5:39, Matthew 5:44, Romans 12:17-21).

Why use principles supported by 3 or more Bible passages?

Because it helps students understand what the Bible teaches (not just what 1 verse teaches) and better apply Biblical teaching to what they study. Trust me, Biblical perspective is better communicated with principles (supported by Bible passages), than just by verses. And having students use principles supported by verses decreases the likelihood that they will misquote Bible verses.

Bottom line: To help your students develop a Christ-centered worldview during class, have your students connect what they are studying with relevant Biblical principles (supported by 3 or more Bible passages).

Michael B. Essenburg © 2008 • Close the Gap • Web: http://closethegapnow.org

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