Science

science

Tech 2Amy Crouch in Comment, June 10, 2021, from Cardus, asks some important questions about technology's promises and suggests a new framework "centred not on ease or distraction, but flourishing. Perhaps we don’t need greater convenience in our communities and callings. Perhaps instead we need help to venture further on the straight-and-narrow path of righteousness."

Our tech devices are designed to make life easier, but maybe ease isn’t what we need. They’re designed to captivate us, but maybe we need time to look up and around.

Silicon Valley’s technologies promised a revolution in speed and convenience, and they certainly delivered. Yet it’s starting to look like those were the wrong promises. 24/7 communication and distraction haven’t relieved us from stress, boredom, or loneliness.

As our lives become increasingly mediated by algorithms and machines, tech designers need to rethink those promises.

If tech companies aren't willing to transform their priorities, all of us as users still have the responsibility to consider our personal use of the tech "gifts" that we're offered continually. That kind of personal transformation may be revolutionary, but it isn't impossible by the power of the indwelling Spirit of God.

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The Devil acts like he owns the place, but he does not. He never created anything. He only distorts and destroys what God has made. In Luke 4:5-6, when Satan offered Jesus “all the kingdoms of the world” in exchange for worshipping him, was this a legitimate offer? Has the Devil ever made a legitimate offer? The gall is appalling.

God has made all things for a purpose. Now let’s see few examples from biology—the living science.

  1. Our body is made up of cells. Different cells have different functions in our body, as well as in plant bodies.
  2. Red blood cells carry oxygen to all parts of the body. They do not have a nucleus, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum so they can adopt the optimum shape for absorption of oxygen.

I’m excited that my 5th grade science students can connect course content to Biblical teaching, resulting in them making healthy choices. In an essay at the end of a recent health unit, students wrote things like, “I learned that…if you're not spiritually healthy, it will affect your physical health.”

I'm excited about the way kids were able to see something as simple as Play Station affects their lives and hearts, that technology has positive and negative impacts. During the presentations, one student said, "It's important to be content, rather than wanting the latest technology." Another student said as she demonstrated her blood sugar tester, "Without this device, I would't be alive… The Bible says we are not to murder, which means we are to protect life. This device protects lives."